Why Hillary Will Never Be President: Part One – The early years


The fact that Hillary Clinton would even be considered as a presidential candidate is astonishing. In an effort to offset the rising tide of conservatism, the Democrat party has opted to hitch its wagons to a tired old nag, calling it “historic.” Most of the Liberals interviewed are backing Hillary simply because she is a woman, and it’s time we had a female president. Are we ready for a woman president? Sure, but not Hillary. I often ask these same Liberals if they would vote for Lindsay Lohan if she were running for president. After all, if you’re only prerequisite is based on gender, then what difference, at this point, does it make? In all fairness though, Hillary has done a better job of staying out of jail.

I can’t fault all Liberals that support Hillary. The mainstream media has done an amazing job of protecting the Clintons over the years. But, at some point, the mainstream media will have to decide whether to continue covering for Hillary and risk losing all credibility, or re-focus their loyalties on a more palatable liberal offering. Hillary is damaged goods and the media knows it. Once Martin O’Malley enters the race, Hillary will be tossed aside like a broken toy from a Happy Meal.

Still, there are millions of voters on both sides of the fence that are oblivious to most of the Clinton scandals, sans Monica. Perhaps it’s time to take a trip down memory lane for those who either missed the entire Clinton circus, or have forgotten.

Hillary Clinton began her less-than-illustrious career by failing the District of Columbia bar exam, a significant underachievement for a graduate of the Yale Law School. She eventually passed the bar exam in Arkansas. Hillary, the attorney, turned out to be quite a prize.

The Watergate Investigation

One of Hillary’s first jobs was working as a staff lawyer for the U.S. House Judiciary, Watergate Select Committee. She worked for the committee’s Chief Counsel, Jerry Zeifman. Hillary’s assignment was to review historical records of impeachment proceedings, then summarize the findings and report them to the committee. Hillary was fired from this position for actions which Zeifman described as ethically flawed and legally inadequate. Those actions included preparing a fraudulent brief, then removing and hiding case files which proved the brief was fraudulent. Using the fraudulent brief, she argued to deny President Nixon legal counsel before the committee. Aside from labeling Hillary a liar, Zeifman, a lifelong Democrat, also claimed that she had conspired to violate the Constitution, as well as the rules of the House and the committee. She also violated confidentiality protocol. “My only regret was I had not reported her unethical practices to the appropriate bar associations.” Zeifman stated, “I could not recommend her for any subsequent position of public or private trust.”

Whitewater

In 1978, the Clintons along with Jim and Susan McDougal, purchased 220 acres of riverfront land for a project known as the Whitewater Development Corp. The purpose of the venture was to sell lots for vacation homes. The Clintons received a fifty percent stake in the project with no cash down. Because of rough economic conditions at the time, the venture was highly leveraged. More than half of the people who purchased building sites in Whitewater lost their land and their down payments due to questionable financing terms. Jim McDougal also owned Madison Savings and Loan, which eventually folded after a series of fraudulent loan-swapping schemes. The McDougals were later indicted and convicted of fraud and conspiracy.

Hillary was accused of representing Madison Savings and Loan in government dealings while Bill Clinton held office. She claimed she had not earned a penny from state business conducted by the Rose Law firm, where she was an attorney, and also claimed she had never represented Madison in dealings with state regulators. Billing records from the Rose Law firm were subpoenaed during the Whitewater investigation, but mysteriously disappeared. The records magically reappeared two years later in the family quarters of the White House, two days after the statute of limitations had expired. Investigators believe that the files had originally been kept in the office of White House counsel Vince Foster, but immediately removed after his suspicious death (ruled a suicide). At that point, investigators believe the files made their way to Hillary’s closet in the basement of former law partner and Associate Attorney General, Webster Hubbell (rumored to be Chelsea Clinton’s biological father). Those records proved that she not only represented Madison before the state securities department, but had also been put on a $2,000 per month retainer by Madison S & L. Subsequent discoveries found that Hillary sent powers of attorney to the McDougals to sign authorizing her (Hillary) to act on the McDougal’s behalf in matters pertaining to the Whitewater Development Corp. The Clintons had maintained all along that they were simply “passive shareholders.”

Hillary also denied any knowledge of a major real estate scam, known as Castle Grande, which led to Madison’s collapse. Webster Hubbell and his father-in-law, Seth Ward, were also active in Castle Grande. Billing records from the Rose Law firm show that Hillary had more than a dozen phone conversations with Ward at the time of Castle Grande, and may have actually conspired with him to perpetrate the scam. Webster Hubbell eventually took the fall for Castle Grande, but refused to implicate Hillary. Coincidentally, Hubbell received more than $700,000, most of it from friends of the Clintons and Democratic Party supporters, at a time when he was under pressure to provide information about Hillary in the Whitewater investigation.

Cattlegate

The Whitewater scam had barely gotten off the ground when Arkansas First Lady Hillary Clinton, with the help of a Tyson Chicken attorney, parlayed a $1,000 investment in cattle futures into a $100,000 profit within nine months using a questionable broker. Hillary claimed that she learned how to trade futures by reading the Wall Street Journal. Several economists later calculated the odds of earning that amount of return in that time period, legally, was about 250 million to one.

Travelgate

Almost immediately after the Clintons took up residence in the White House, Hillary Clinton ordered her staff to convince the FBI to investigate the White House Travel Office and find “something” that could be used as grounds for dismissal of the existing staff. Her goal was to replace the current staff with Little Rock, Arkansas based World Wide Travel, a company with several ties to the Clintons. The travel office director, Billy Dale, and six of his employees were fired based a rumor that they had been involved in criminal activity. Dale was indicted on charges of embezzlement. The jury needed only two hours to acquit him of all charges. Bill Clinton’s cousin, Catherine Cornelius, ended up running the travel office. Hillary Clinton told congressional investigators she played no role in the firing of employees. However, a memo from White House aide David Watkins was later found which stated “There would be hell to pay if we failed to take swift and decisive action in conformity with the first lady’s wishes.” Hillary also coerced a White House attorney to mislead investigators about her role in the firings. The Travelgate scandal was the final straw that prompted New York Times Columnist William Safire to label Hillary Clinton as “a congenital liar.” 

Filegate

Approximately 900 confidential FBI files of former Reagan and Bush Appointees were sent to White House security chief Craig Livingstone. Former Rose Law firm partner and Hillary confidante William Kennedy was given unlimited access to these files, an arrangement which FBI director Louis Freeh called “an egregious violation of privacy.” A civil suit filed on behalf of the victims has uncovered evidence that the files were used as part of a campaign of political espionage ordered by Hillary Clinton herself. All damaging information was gleaned from the files and presumably was to be used at a later time to blackmail or smear the victims.

These five examples barely scratch the surface with regard to Hillary Clinton’s legacy of corrupt behavior. Future installments of this article will cover a virtual mountain of Hillary Clinton lies and cover-ups. Stay tuned.